Basic Fundamental Rights

Here some basic rights:

1) Freedom of movement without permits or controls for citizens;

2) Freedom from confiscation of private property;

3) Freedom of expression speech and the press;

4) Freedom from unreasonable search and seizure;

5) Freedom from arbitrary arrest, delays of justice and judgment with a trial by jury;

6) Freedom to defend one self with arms;

7) Freedom to discriminate between people you wish to associate or do business with;

8) Freedom to engage in any activity not violating the fundamental rights of others;

9) Freedom of ownership and control of private property;

10) Freedom from redistribution of income by government via confiscatory taxation;

11) Freedom to contract freely with other willing parties without government regulation or licensing; and

12) Freedom to choose how to medically care for yourself and family.

Abu Hureyra, Syria + archaeological evidence for domestication

In 1963, despite fact project would eventually flood dozens of modern villages and ancient sites. The government of Syrian Arab Republic, decided to create dams on upper Euphrates river. Culminating a series of excavation and archaeological rescue operations. Among them, an extraordinary neolithic site. Abu Hureyra.
In a short span of less than 35 years. They gathered more information about the human being transition to agriculture, then anywhere previously; with more details. Using + setting the standard for new techniques, and with less time.

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Neolithic Critter: Woolly Mammoth

The Woolly Mammoth is a prehistoric animal who became extinct about 3900 years ago when the last ice age ended. Scientists have a lot of information about what this animal looked like thanks to the discovery of frozen mammoth carcasses in Alaska and Siberia. In 2012, in an area where he walked his dogs, an 11 year old Russian kid discovered the remnants of what turned out to be a very well preserved 30,000 year old woolly Mammoth. In 2013, in Russia, scientists discovered a baby woolly mammoth in an ice tomb. Every so often a Woolly Mammoth body parts will be discovered as well.

Woolly Mammoth Facts
• In 1796, Georges Cuvier, a French Zoologist, was the first to identify the Woolly Mammoth as an extinct species of the elephant.
• Similar in size and features to the Asian elephant, the adult Woolly Mammoth was approximately 10 feet tall (3 meters) and weighted about 6 tons (5443 kg). Newborns weighed approximately 200 pounds (90kg) at birth. Females are less.
• Early humans killed Woolly Mammoths for a number of reasons. They ate the meat, but they also made art, homes and tools out of the bones and tusks, and fur to keep warm.
• Why did the Woolly Mammoth become extinct? A definitive reason for why they became extinct is not available; however most scientists believe climate change and hunting caused its demise.

• Although ethical questions remain, the possibility exists that scientists could use the Woolly Mammoth’s genetic material with a female elephants, to one day clone and recreate the animal.
• Using there big molar teeth, the Woolly Mammoth was a herbivore that ate a variety of leaves, fruits, berries, nuts, and twigs.
• Similar to the rings on a tree, or clogged arteries on a human, scientists can determine the age and health of a Woolly Mammoth by the rings on its tusks.
• Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean, may have been the last known home of about 500-1000 Woolly Mammoths until just before 1700 BC when they fully became extinct.


Woolly Mammoths are different
• The Woolly Mammoth lived in extremely cold, arctic environments. Using there thick skin, fur, and small ears, they became well adapted to survive in this type of habitat.
• As the name suggests, the Woolly Mammoth was covered with fur but to really keep them warm, they had about four inches of pure fat for insulation underneath their skin.
• The ears and tail of the Woolly Mammoth were relatively short so they would not get frostbite and to minimize heat loss. Modern day elephants have ears that reach 180 cm (71″) where the Woolly Mammoth’s ears only reached about 30 cm (12″).
• Blood samples taken by scientists have determined that the hemoglobin of the Woolly Mammoth was even adapted to the cold environment, allowing the animal’s tissue to be supplied with oxygen no matter what the temperature.
• The jaw and teeth of the Woolly Mammoth were more vertical than modern elephants and it is believed that it allowed them to more easily feed on grass.
• The long prominent tusks of the Woolly Mammoth could reach up to 15 feet (4.5 meters) long. They would have been used for pushing away ice and snow as well as fighting and defending.

It is believed if the Woolly mammoth is cloned, it will have problems digesting due to the difference of thousands of years of microbes (things and bacteria in stomach that help digest food). There are projects at Harvard and other institutions looking into it right now! There are also ethical questions about using female elephants embryo’s, a number of times, to hybrid, then re-create the species (3-4 breeding cycles after). What do you think? Do Canadians, Russians and Scandinavians stand a better chance to recreate the species, using there arctic north, perhaps to re-invigorate post covid tourisms, with a modern day computer coded and critter cloned Disney land?

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Dymaxion map showing the Late Pleistocene distribution of M. primigenius in blue (light blue was land at the time), inferred from fossil finds
Found frozen in Siberia in 2007, Yuka died from choking on mud 39,000 years ago copy
Woolly 1

Many people claimed to analyze stainless steel first. Here are some of the facts:


-Discovery of chromium was in 1797 by Louis Nicholas Vauquelin;
-Development of ferrochromium was by Pierre Berthier in 1821. Though it was was weak. With high carbon content. Productions mostly failed;
-A provisional British patent was obtained for an “acid- and weather-resistant” steel alloy with ~31% chromium in 1872. Patent was never filed;
-Hans Goldschmidt developed a method for producing better low-carbon ferrochromium in 1895;
-Henri Moisson, may have developed stronger Ferrochromium, in 1895 but it was never published;
-A. Carnot and E. Goutal did report that high carbon contents reduce corrosion resistance of chromium-added steel in 1898; and
-Nearly 10 years later, Leon Guillet was sometimes credited with the development of stainless steels. He published papers starting in 1904 where he analyzed the mechanical properties for high chromium steels.

After this, one person, became popular. Harry Brearley, who was an employee of Firth Brown Research Laboratories, was credited with industrial use of stainless steel,
“Nobody was impressed; perhaps the idea of producing on a commercial scale a steel which would not corrode sounded ridiculous.”

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Where did the Narrative originate from? Joan Didion, Political Fictions: “Decaying group think in political organizations.”, 1988

Narrative is: “Elite management of public life.”

In 1988, Joan Didion began looking at the American political process for “The New York Review of Books.” What she found was not a mechanism that offered the nation’s citizens a voice in its affairs but one designed by–and for–“that handful of insiders who invent, year in and year out, the narrative of public life.” The eight pieces collected here from “The New York Review” build, one on the other, to a stunning whole, a portrait of the American political landscape that tells us, devastatingly, how we got where we are today.
In “Political Fictions,” tracing the dreamwork that was already clear at the time of the first Bush ascendance in 1988, Didion covers the ways in which the continuing and polarizing nostalgia for an imagined America led to the entrenchment of a small percentage of the electorate as the nation’s deciding political force, the ways in which the two major political parties have worked to narrow the electorate to this manageable element, the readiness with which the media collaborated in this process, and, finally and at length, how this mindset led inexorably over the past dozen years to the crisis that was the 2000 election. In this book Didion cuts to the core of the deceptions and deflections to explain and illuminate what came to be called “the disconnect”–and to reveal a political class increasingly intolerant of the nation that sustains it.