Basic Fundamental Rights

Here some basic rights:

1) Freedom of movement without permits or controls for citizens;

2) Freedom from confiscation of private property;

3) Freedom of expression speech and the press;

4) Freedom from unreasonable search and seizure;

5) Freedom from arbitrary arrest, delays of justice and judgment with a trial by jury;

6) Freedom to defend one self with arms;

7) Freedom to discriminate between people you wish to associate or do business with;

8) Freedom to engage in any activity not violating the fundamental rights of others;

9) Freedom of ownership and control of private property;

10) Freedom from redistribution of income by government via confiscatory taxation;

11) Freedom to contract freely with other willing parties without government regulation or licensing; and

12) Freedom to choose how to medically care for yourself and family.

Abu Hureyra, Syria + archaeological evidence for domestication

In 1963, despite fact project would eventually flood dozens of modern villages and ancient sites. The government of Syrian Arab Republic, decided to create dams on upper Euphrates river. Culminating a series of excavation and archaeological rescue operations. Among them, an extraordinary neolithic site. Abu Hureyra.
In a short span of less than 35 years. They gathered more information about the human being transition to agriculture, then anywhere previously; with more details. Using + setting the standard for new techniques, and with less time.

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Neolithic information.

Neolithic Architecture Daub: Obermeilen, and Robenhausen sites; Zurichsee, Bodensee, Wauwilwemoos lakes, Switzerland

During 1853-54, prolonged drought cause water in alpine lakes to drop 1 foot below lowest recorded levels.
In winter 54’, men began to begin a “land reclamation project.”

They uncovered a lake village.
First of hundreds in alpine Europe.

An enormous amount of building material preserved: remnants of wooden frames, plank floors, wattle and white walls, with thatched roofs.

So much, that dendrochronology, (tree ring dating), provided year by year site histories, firmly identifying the earliest villages on Zurichsee , Bodensee, Wauwilwemoos lakes (more than 5000 years old).

Neolithic villagers, continued to live by the lakes for the next 3 millennia. In fact, the preserved material remains two cultural transitions: from seasonal foraging, to sedentary agriculture, and from stone tools to the use of bronze.

Preservation of organic material from these settlements was extraordinary. Artifacts from almost every aspect of everyday life in Neolithic Europe survived. The lake dwellers relied heavily on wood. Besides using it for there houses, and dugout canoes, they made wooden bowls, spoons, and ladels, chisels, hooks, and knife handles; bows and clubs; and, loom parts. They also used animal bones, teeth, tusks and antlers, to make beds needles, pins, awls, chisels, saws, arrowheads, handles for stone axes, and at least one fish hook. They made chipped and ground stone tools, and at some sites, they made pottery.

The list of plant remains gives some idea of the wealth of remains from these sites. List of plants include: wheat, barley, millet; peas, apples, pears, plums, sloes, raspberries, blackberries, and strawberries; dog rose, elder and bilberry; and, caraway seeds, beech nuts, hickory nuts and water chestnuts; Even fava beans, which the villagers may have grown. Rarely preserved on European sites, providing particularly interesting cultural information. Flax and opium poppies were also found at the sites.

Did you know 3/4 of weight of poppy seed is its oil, and that besides its use in bread, and pain relief, raw oil can be used to burn in lamps.

Neolithic Architecture: Kimmswick Bone Bed, Jefferson County Missouri

Neolithic Site 32km SW of St. Louis. In upper Mississippi valley, 2.5km west of Mississippi River, at confluence of 4 North American drainage basins (upper Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, and Tennessee rivers). Where 30% of American contiguous land mass is drained.
Mastodon remains were identified, including butchering and human presence.
Laurentide ice sheet appears to have reach its max about 350km to east. By time of occupation (estimate, early neolithic), glacier tied 800km north (present day upper Great Lakes basin). The site was probably situated in mixed deciduous (oak, hickory) forest, mixed with prairie grasses. 127meters above sea level. The sites axis is oriented southwest to northwest, 2300 square meters. There is a 20m high limestone bluff in the north. With unobstructed views of the Mississippi River south east, and rock creek valleys to the south and west.
Founded by French/Creole fur trader, and St. Louis co-founder Pierre Chouteu in 1790s. The earliest known excevations were in 1839, by Albert Koch. Who recovered a American Mastodon (mammut americanum) for display at his St. Louis museum. Numerous others began excavation including businessmen who opened a museum at the site around 1900. And, Smithsonium archaeologists who couldn’t declare what was cultural remains, and introduced there after. Modern era of professional investigation began in 1970s, when government bought, in preparation to convert the mastodon state historic site.
7 discrete strata were identified including extinct and entact large mammals: mastodon, long nosed peccary and Harlans ground sloth. Numerous species of small vertebrates, and a large fire pit with Harlans ground sloth.
Though relatively few artifacts were recovered, apart from mastodon, presence of diverse abundant animal species,(white tail, fish, amphibians, reptiles (turtles, birds, small mammals), suggests site was adaptable to environmental conditions.

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