Neolithic Architecture: Pest Control, Chimney Cleaning, Log Cabin Building

Pest Control, Chimney Cleaning and Log Cabin Building

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Basic Fundamental Rights

Here some basic rights:

1) Freedom of movement without permits or controls for citizens;

2) Freedom from confiscation of private property;

3) Freedom of expression speech and the press;

4) Freedom from unreasonable search and seizure;

5) Freedom from arbitrary arrest, delays of justice and judgment with a trial by jury;

6) Freedom to defend one self with arms;

7) Freedom to discriminate between people you wish to associate or do business with;

8) Freedom to engage in any activity not violating the fundamental rights of others;

9) Freedom of ownership and control of private property;

10) Freedom from redistribution of income by government via confiscatory taxation;

11) Freedom to contract freely with other willing parties without government regulation or licensing; and

12) Freedom to choose how to medically care for yourself and family.

Abu Hureyra, Syria + archaeological evidence for domestication

In 1963, despite fact project would eventually flood dozens of modern villages and ancient sites. The government of Syrian Arab Republic, decided to create dams on upper Euphrates river. Culminating a series of excavation and archaeological rescue operations. Among them, an extraordinary neolithic site. Abu Hureyra.
In a short span of less than 35 years. They gathered more information about the human being transition to agriculture, then anywhere previously; with more details. Using + setting the standard for new techniques, and with less time.

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Neolithic information.

Neolithic Critter: Woolly Mammoth

The Woolly Mammoth is a prehistoric animal who became extinct about 3900 years ago when the last ice age ended. Scientists have a lot of information about what this animal looked like thanks to the discovery of frozen mammoth carcasses in Alaska and Siberia. In 2012, in an area where he walked his dogs, an 11 year old Russian kid discovered the remnants of what turned out to be a very well preserved 30,000 year old woolly Mammoth. In 2013, in Russia, scientists discovered a baby woolly mammoth in an ice tomb. Every so often a Woolly Mammoth body parts will be discovered as well.

Woolly Mammoth Facts
• In 1796, Georges Cuvier, a French Zoologist, was the first to identify the Woolly Mammoth as an extinct species of the elephant.
• Similar in size and features to the Asian elephant, the adult Woolly Mammoth was approximately 10 feet tall (3 meters) and weighted about 6 tons (5443 kg). Newborns weighed approximately 200 pounds (90kg) at birth. Females are less.
• Early humans killed Woolly Mammoths for a number of reasons. They ate the meat, but they also made art, homes and tools out of the bones and tusks, and fur to keep warm.
• Why did the Woolly Mammoth become extinct? A definitive reason for why they became extinct is not available; however most scientists believe climate change and hunting caused its demise.

• Although ethical questions remain, the possibility exists that scientists could use the Woolly Mammoth’s genetic material with a female elephants, to one day clone and recreate the animal.
• Using there big molar teeth, the Woolly Mammoth was a herbivore that ate a variety of leaves, fruits, berries, nuts, and twigs.
• Similar to the rings on a tree, or clogged arteries on a human, scientists can determine the age and health of a Woolly Mammoth by the rings on its tusks.
• Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean, may have been the last known home of about 500-1000 Woolly Mammoths until just before 1700 BC when they fully became extinct.


Woolly Mammoths are different
• The Woolly Mammoth lived in extremely cold, arctic environments. Using there thick skin, fur, and small ears, they became well adapted to survive in this type of habitat.
• As the name suggests, the Woolly Mammoth was covered with fur but to really keep them warm, they had about four inches of pure fat for insulation underneath their skin.
• The ears and tail of the Woolly Mammoth were relatively short so they would not get frostbite and to minimize heat loss. Modern day elephants have ears that reach 180 cm (71″) where the Woolly Mammoth’s ears only reached about 30 cm (12″).
• Blood samples taken by scientists have determined that the hemoglobin of the Woolly Mammoth was even adapted to the cold environment, allowing the animal’s tissue to be supplied with oxygen no matter what the temperature.
• The jaw and teeth of the Woolly Mammoth were more vertical than modern elephants and it is believed that it allowed them to more easily feed on grass.
• The long prominent tusks of the Woolly Mammoth could reach up to 15 feet (4.5 meters) long. They would have been used for pushing away ice and snow as well as fighting and defending.

It is believed if the Woolly mammoth is cloned, it will have problems digesting due to the difference of thousands of years of microbes (things and bacteria in stomach that help digest food). There are projects at Harvard and other institutions looking into it right now! There are also ethical questions about using female elephants embryo’s, a number of times, to hybrid, then re-create the species (3-4 breeding cycles after). What do you think? Do Canadians, Russians and Scandinavians stand a better chance to recreate the species, using there arctic north, perhaps to re-invigorate post covid tourisms, with a modern day computer coded and critter cloned Disney land?

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Neolithicarchitecture.com
Ethical Pest Control, Chimney Cleaning and Log Cabin Building

Dymaxion map showing the Late Pleistocene distribution of M. primigenius in blue (light blue was land at the time), inferred from fossil finds
Found frozen in Siberia in 2007, Yuka died from choking on mud 39,000 years ago copy
Woolly 1

Neolithic Architecture: Kimmswick Bone Bed, Jefferson County Missouri

Neolithic Site 32km SW of St. Louis. In upper Mississippi valley, 2.5km west of Mississippi River, at confluence of 4 North American drainage basins (upper Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, and Tennessee rivers). Where 30% of American contiguous land mass is drained.
Mastodon remains were identified, including butchering and human presence.
Laurentide ice sheet appears to have reach its max about 350km to east. By time of occupation (estimate, early neolithic), glacier tied 800km north (present day upper Great Lakes basin). The site was probably situated in mixed deciduous (oak, hickory) forest, mixed with prairie grasses. 127meters above sea level. The sites axis is oriented southwest to northwest, 2300 square meters. There is a 20m high limestone bluff in the north. With unobstructed views of the Mississippi River south east, and rock creek valleys to the south and west.
Founded by French/Creole fur trader, and St. Louis co-founder Pierre Chouteu in 1790s. The earliest known excevations were in 1839, by Albert Koch. Who recovered a American Mastodon (mammut americanum) for display at his St. Louis museum. Numerous others began excavation including businessmen who opened a museum at the site around 1900. And, Smithsonium archaeologists who couldn’t declare what was cultural remains, and introduced there after. Modern era of professional investigation began in 1970s, when government bought, in preparation to convert the mastodon state historic site.
7 discrete strata were identified including extinct and entact large mammals: mastodon, long nosed peccary and Harlans ground sloth. Numerous species of small vertebrates, and a large fire pit with Harlans ground sloth.
Though relatively few artifacts were recovered, apart from mastodon, presence of diverse abundant animal species,(white tail, fish, amphibians, reptiles (turtles, birds, small mammals), suggests site was adaptable to environmental conditions.

kimmswick-bone-bed
albert-koch-and-mastodon-mammut-americanum
one-of-few-know-clovis-points-unearthed-from-site-1900
historical-compilation
stratigraphic-profile-of-deposits
1980-excevations.-site-may-have-been-swampy-and-trapped-mastodons-and-preserved-bones
kimmswick-clovis-points-dating-to-early-neolithic
mastodon-rib-with-clovis-point-right-thru-unearthed-in-1980

quarries-likely-sources-of-lithic-raw-materials-what-tools-were-manufactured-from
kimmswich-bone-bed-stone-lithic-tools

Strangers in new land (2016)

Folsom, NM
Blackwater draw, NM
Lehner, Murray springs, and Naco, AZ
Shoop, Penns.
Kimmswick bone bed, MI
Bonfire shelter, TX
Central Alaska (broken mammoth, dry creek, swan point, and walker rd.) Alaska
Elfin de mundo, Mexico

Old Crow
Calico mtn, Cali
Pendejo cave, NM
Tule springs, NV
Pedra Furada, Piavi, Brazil

Meadowcraft rockshelter, Penns.
Monte Verde, Llanquihue, Chilie
Cactus hill, Virginia
Paisley 5 made pt caves, Oregon
Schaefer & heblor mammoth, Wisconsin
Buttermilk creek, Texas (D Freilkin and Gault)

Topper, SC
Saltville, VI.
Taima-taima, Venezuela & Tibia, Columbia
Bluefish caves, Yukon
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Neolithic Architecture Site(s): Shoop, East Pennsylvania.

Shoop, Dauphin County, East Pennsylvania, 25km NE Harrisburg, 150km NW Philadelphia.

George Gordon discovered 1930s, looted and collected since.
6500 know, 3500 documented lithic artifacts and flakes. Including stone tools, flakes, projectile points. Over 80 years!
A suspected 98% of sites paleoindian artifacts were made from Onondaga chert. Quarried at Divers Lake. Located 40km west of Buffalo (or about 300km NW of site)

1st scholarly report published in 1952, was only 3rd known paleoindian locality east of the Mississippi River.

Situated on eastern half of 375000 hectare lower Susquehanna river-Penns creek watershed.

Site lies in, small, upland valley, less than 1km north of the divide between two Susquehanna tributary streams (Armstrong creek in north, Powell creek in south). Region is complex in physiogeographic terms.

Following the pre-neolithic glacial retreat. Regional geographic changed from open parkland tundra (spruce, pine, fir, interspersed with grasses, sedges, heath species and shrubs), to a boreal forest dominated by white pine and white birch; though locally slopes were dominated by spruce and pine, and level areas had grasses and species like Oak. A spring on SE margin supplied water year round.

Neolithic Site: Shoop
2 centuries of plowing made collecting artifacts tough
Map showing boundaries of 9 physiographic sections that occur within 50km of site
Tan shaly bedrock
Students collect artifacts
Formal Shoop Boundaries
jasper adzes
Hypothetical Shoop lithic core and evolution of endscrapers
Friends and Mr. Shoop inspect the site