In 1867, in a field in Denmark, a little boy discovered something magical. Hindsgavl Dagger is Hindsgavldolken

It was immediately brought to the property managers attention. He offered the boy the equivelant of 90 dollars, and he couldn’t refuse. The manager then gifted it to the owner of the estate.  Basse Fonss of Hinsgavl Manor.

Hingsgavl manor was apart of the Hindsgavl. It’s the pieces of land that connect Frederica and Middlefart (centre of Denmark).

As the Exposition Universelle at Paris approached in 1889. Danish collectors realized they needed something big. The museum never lent out objects but always sent copies.  Since Hindsgavldolken was private owned, Basse Fonss was approached. He agreed to lend it out. 


After the Exposition universelle, the museum and collectors were so impressed with its attraction and features. They made Basse an offer he couldn’t refuse.   

About:
Production of stone daggers continued into the bronze age. Especially in the north. It’s believed this dagger was produced around 4000 years ago. It is almost 30cm long, and the blade thickness is less than 1cm. It shines a beautiful black and brown.

Did you know? The 100 krone danish bank note (about 15.5$ usd) features Hindsgavldolken, or Hindsgavl Dagger.

Font-de-Gaume is a well known cave in south west France

Located near Les Eyzies-de-Tayac-Sireuil in the Dordogne department.
Font-de-Gaume cave contents contain paintings in several colours dating to almost 30,000 years.

While exploring the area, in 1901 Denis Peyrony discovered the paintings.

Prehistoric people lived in the Dordogne valley around 25000 thousand years ago. The cave was inhabited for several thousand years. Something must have happened. Because there after, the cave is believed to be long forgotten.

Many of the drawings date from around 19,000 years ago. The most famous is of 5 bison, and was discovered by accident in the 1960s when scientists were cleaning the cave.
More than 230 figures are believed to have been recorded in the cave. Included is 80 bison, 40 horses and 20 mammoths. Some say there are even more yet to be discovered.

Did you know? 200 of the paintings are in multi colour. Making Font-de-Gaume one of the best examples of polychrome (multi colour) paintings other than Lascaux.

Check it out today.

Cap Blanc rock shelter is a limestone rock shelter with sculptures, and magdalenian women. It is in the west of France.

In 1908 Cap Blanc was discovered under supervision, while others worked nearby uncovering Lascaux and the Lascaux cave. While digging they found one of the most impressive carvings from the upper paleolithic.
Following the uncovering of this, the carving and additional frieze, in 1911, they built protective walls around the area. It included lowering the floor. And, at which point one of the workers hit a skull. It was Magdalenian women.

Located in the Marquay commune on the right bank of the Beune River, a few kilometers west of Eyzies-de-Tayac, in Dordogne.

What is a frieze? A frieze is a broad horizontal band of sculpted or painted decoration, especially on a wall near the ceiling.

The frieze depicts a number of animals, some in haut-relief, dating back 15,000 years. These include ten horses (one measuring 2.20 m long), at least three bison, ibex and several incomplete figures. The sculpted frieze occupies 13 of the 16 meters of the shelter.
Some of the carving are as much as 30 cm deep. Red ochre covers much of the frieze and some of the area around it is now difficult to see. Among other flint tools probably used to create the frieze were found with the Magdalenian women and include burins and scrapers.

The skeleton known as Magdalenian women is that of an early modern human dating from 13,000 to 11,000 BCE, during the Magdalenian period. It is the most complete upper paleolithic skeleton in northern Europe. When Magdalenian women was acquired in 1926 for the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois, by Henry Field, then curator of Physical Anthropology. It was hailed as one of the most significant acquisitions the large museum ever made. On the first day the precious skeleton was exhibited, tens of thousands of visitors flocked to the museum to see it.

In 1910 the site was classified as a French historical monument. Currently there are guided tours, a museum and replica of magdelenian women. Be sure to check it out!

History of log cabin building

Log cabins have been affiliated with almost anything living. However more often than not, it has been the ancient history in Europe and the early settlers in the eastern US and Canadian wilderness. When do you think humans started log cabin building?
In Northern Europe or Russia, there are cabins from 3 or 4 thousand years ago. Ones that had there roofs somewhat maintained are still standing, or have been up cycled elsewhere.


Similarly to the lack of raft, ship and boat evidence before 1500ad. During roman, and war times, it was noted many log cabins were built, to be de-constructed and transported to battlefields, for weapons; even boats, jigs, firewood or whatever manufactured wood pieces were necessary at the time. It’s believed not much was left around but was re-used sustainably.
Most cultures were log cabin builders. Provided they had a flint, chert or sharp enough lithic tool supply. To manufacture broadaxes, and other pieces of stone capable of chopping suitable flat trees down, and notching the bark and tree part way out to overlap.

Architecturally speaking, in De Architectura, was the first mention of log cabins using construction with logs. It was described by Roman architect Vitruvius Pollio (20-30bc). He noted that dwellings in northeastern Turkey were constructed by laying logs horizontally overtop of each other and filling in the gaps with “chips and mud”. Most people nowadays call it chinking.

In modern times, important aspects of log cabin building are often the site upon which the cabin was built. It is aimed at providing the cabin inhabitants with both sunlight, drainage, and protection from wind and rain to help them able them see better. And, to be able to thrive and cope. Finding trees in an area on or nearby your building site, is an important factor, and thus studied in archaelogical and building site history because of it (even though most of the logs are decomposed). Extreme weather, animal attacks, and staying warm; dry and safe are also factors.

Did you know? Log cabins have origins in US politics since the early 19th century. At least seven United States presidents were born in log cabins, including Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Abraham Lincoln, and James A. Garfield. William Henry Harrison was not one of the presidents. However during the 1840 presidential election his party were the first to use a log cabin as symbol to show Americans that he was a man of the people.

Did you know? Possibly the oldest surviving log house in the United States is the C. A. Nothnagle Log House (c. 1640) in New Jersey.

More recently coastal and interior log cabins builders have become popular due to there proximity to large fir, cedar, spruce and pine trees. And, the sustainability aspects of building close to the forest.

Interested in log cabin building?
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References:
Revised Log Construction Manual – Ultimate Guide To Building Log Homes – Full Color Edition Paperback – Unabridged, January 1, 2016
by Robert W. Chambers (Author) ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0971573638

Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Log_cabin

Altamira cave is in Spain, and very well known.

Formed in the twisting calcareous rock passages of Mount Vispieres. Around 13,000 years ago a rockfall sealed the Altamiras entrance. Its contents were preserved until its eventual discovery, which occurred after a nearby tree fell and disturbed the fallen rocks.

It was 1868 was when Modeso Cubillas discovered the Altamira cave. The cave is approximately 1,000 m (3,300 ft) long. A few years after its discovery, feeling so inclined, Marcelino Sanz de Sautuola, and the university of Madrid begin studying the cave. In 1880, with support of others, reports of the cave were published, to initial public acclaim. It began a debate began about the abstract thinking for the time, and if humans were able to draw this way 10s of thousands of years ago. It stopped around 1902, (and continued on), when more caves were found in this and the French region(s).

Did you know? Before 18,500; and, after 15,000 years ago there was evidence of human life. During the two millennia in-between, in was believed prehistoric megafauna inhibited the cave.

Cave life 10,000:
The ‘polychrome ceiling’ is the most impressive feature of the cave. Depicting a herd of extinct steppe bison (bison priscus) in different poses; two horses, a large doe, and possibly a wild boar. Human occupation was limited to the cave mouth, although paintings were created throughout the length of the cave. Charcoal, ochre and hematite were used to create the images. Diluting these pigments to produce variations in intensity and creating an impression of chiaroscuro. They also exploited the natural contours of the cave walls to give their subjects a three-dimensional effect.

Did you know? The drawings were very well preserved. And, it could have been the oils and gases used in lanterns. A number of years after Altamiras discovery, in early 1900, it was discovered early ancestors or those from the stone age could had used marrow fat.

Visitors and replicas:
During the 1970s, and 2000s, the paintings were being damaged by visitors carbon dioxide and vapor. Altamira was completely closed in the late 1970s; reopened for a bit, and again was closed in early 2000s.

Interested in seeing Altamiras reproductions?
The National Museum and Research Center of Altamira;
National Archaeological Museum of Spain;
Deutsches Museum Germany (1964); and,
Japan (1993).

Grotte Chauvet-point d’arc is Chauvet Cave located in SE France with cave drawings more than 30,000 years ago.

Its soft clay-like floor retains the paw prints of cave bears along with large, rounded depressions that are believed to be the “nests” where the Europen cave bears slept. In Grotte Chauvet-point d’arc, fossilized bones are abundant, and include the skulls of cave bears, and the horned skull of an ibex.

Located near the commune of Vallon-Pont-d’Arc. On a limestone cliff, above the former bed of the river Ardèche, in the Gorges de l’Ardèche, is Chauvet cave. It is situated above the previous course of the Ardèche river before the Pont d’Arc opened up. The gorges of the Ardèche region and the site are numerous. There are many caves, much of them having some geological or archaeological importance.

This cave is amongst the best preserved caves in the world. Chauvet cave remained untouched for possibly thousands of years before it was discovered in 1994. Evidence suggests that it was due to a landslide which covered its historical entrance. Left with the cave bear foot prints were little child’s footprints, the charred remains of ancient hearths, and carbon smoke stains from torches that lit the caves.

Like many European caves, dates have been a matter of dispute. A study published in 2012 supports placing the art approximately 32,000–30,000 years ago. A newer study published in 2016, using additional 88 radiocarbon dates ,showed two periods of habitation, one 37,000- 33,500; and, the other from 31,000 to 28,000 years ago. Most of the black drawings were from even earlier periods.

Artistic ‘shamanal’ components?
Some say a magical ‘venus’ figure composed of what appears to be a vulva attached to an incomplete pair of legs is seen in the cave. Above the Venus, and in contact with it, is a bisons head. Most had led to describe the composite drawing as a Minotaur (half bull), or Centaur (half horse), or ??.
The cave even has panels of red ochre hand stencils. From blowing the crushed up pigments of ochre over hands pressed against the caves surface. And, abstract markings—lines and dots—are found throughout the cave. There are also two unidentifiable images that have a vaguely butterfly or avian shape to them. This and/or the combination of subjects (including other caves in the area) lead many to believe that there was a ritual, shamanic, or magical aspect to these paintings, and lives of humans, tens of thousands of years ago.

Lots of drawings:
The artists who produced these paintings used techniques rarely found in other cave art. Many of the paintings appear to have been made only after the walls were scraped clear of debris and concretions, leaving a smoother and noticeably lighter area upon which the artists worked.
Popular paintings include what is suggested as being a dog, however these have been challenged as being a wolf.
Hundreds of animal paintings have been catalogued, depicting at least 13 different species.
Rather than depicting only the familiar herbivores that predominate in Paleolithic cave art, i.e. horses, aurochs, mammoths, etc., the walls of the Chauvet Cave feature many predatory animals, e.g., cave lions, leopards, bears, and cave hyenas. There is also paintings of whoolly rhinoceroses. Which had not been found in North America.
One drawing, later overlaid with a sketch of a deer, is reminiscent of a volcano spewing lava, similar to the regional volcanoes that were active at the time. If confirmed, this would represent the earliest known drawing of a volcanic eruption.

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Times of our lives 3?: 100$ pieces of plastic w/ copper, lithium and precious metals. Maybe we don’t know what fun is anymore

There was a time when we valued $100 pieces of plastic w/ copper and precious metals. Combined with disease, and vaccines, so corporations could amount mass data. A microchipped robotic digital future.

Yet we don’t know much past 5 or 6 thousand years. 30,000 years and beyond. Almost nothing. Who and what were these people? And, what constitutes a lively, or true “time of life” events?

Times of our lives: neolithic hunting history. What’s considered life stories of ancestry, when most of history was before writing?


Is it insights gained from archaeology, climate and the environment? Were the happiest humans truly those strong and most willing to find and hunt woolly rhino or mammoth? Giant cats, bears, dog, sloth and armadillo? Were they big tough Log and stone builders?? Large enough to keep a living space warm and pest free?

What defined leadership of cultures, and races of people? For example. Was it those willing to explore and travel to cooler and more rugged areas of the northern Europe? How about those who went up and beyond the mid western north America and Canadian glaciers aged 15 thousand years ago? What about Beringa and Greenland? Are these pest log chimney hunters the greatest humans to have ever lived?

Lets look at bibliographies of individual sites and groups. Danish, some german and northern europeans were identified as building some of the first sailable log boats. An answer could be yes. These people were tough, probably got a little wet. They saw, hunted, killed, built and survived through some of the most beautiful tough landscapes and animals earth will ever know.

How about history as a narrative based on predictable archaeology? Many middle eastern and southern settlements eventually declined, or went back and forth temporarily. Vindicated perhaps it was there strong hunters, builders that probably moved when bad things were happening. They exercised there freedoms, and skills by going elsewhere, and more likely north.

Consider from within? Did you like eating raw plants, and meat? Darkness? Making things from nothing? Cooler unpredictable weather? Better humans enjoy this. They were not predominately affected by temporal scales of history. They wanted to thrive. Consider deep thinking, or deep history. Linking archaeology, anthropology; with pest control, chimney cleaning, and log building. That’s Groundbreaking. Its big.

Historical and methodological techniques reconstructing timelines. Mostly relate to continents, and alpine wetland settlements. Where food and supplies were readily available. Wasn’t easy. Annual dating of events; houses/shelter, and year specific settlement growth. That were relevant to these alpine wetland or landscape specific histories. Is proven where the quantity of recovered material (or data). Is significant enough to allow both typological and scientific dating.

Methods for this were already seriated. That is, things, order things. With absolute chronologies (stratographic and radiometric dating) conferred around 1980.

Precise chronologies are the only form of narrative. And, so must be considered with respect to there respective partners in Europe, Africa, north and South America, Asia, Africa, Australia and so on.

Using one of the greatest timelines in prehistory. Theoretical concepts including deep knowledge and dating approaches should be applauded. Not only for the neolithic hunting history of snagging a great beast. But for the good of neolithic architecture, pest control, chimney cleaning and log cabin building in general.

Doggerland: 8247-8192 years ago, the storegga slide was a landslide that involved an estimated 180 mile length of coastal shelf in the Norwegian Sea which caused a large tsunami.

There had long been talk of a secret bank, and group of men inhabiting a land stretched far and wide. In Greece, legends spoke of it, receding from the last glacial maximum, from northern Spain; to England, Ireland, Scotland; between, France, Holland; and extending thu Germany to even Denmark, Sweden and Norway. In 1931, a famous discovery made the headlines when a trawler named ‘Colinda’ hauled up a lump of peat while fishing near the Ower Bank, 25 miles off the English coast. To the astonishment of the fisherman, the peat contained an ‘ornate barbed antler point’ used for harpooning fish that dated from between 9,000-4,000 BC. This was what started the ‘imminent rush’, to began researching ‘doggerland’ and the ‘doggerbank’.

Around 8200 years ago, after the storegga slide, and the water enraged typhoon hit. For about 1500 years, all that was left was ‘doggerbank’. Until more glaciers melted, ‘doggerbank’ was above water but when more glaciers melted, it became submerged. Around 7000 years ago. And, so began the separation of mainland Europe, from England, and other area islands, that eventually all almost became under water.

What is a ‘ornate barb antler point’?

An ‘ornate barbed antler point’ was probably an elk or deer, possibly something larger like mammoth, bear or cave lion too. Sharpened with a blade, or, bone, flint and/or sharp chert stone piece designed for cutting. Similar to big arrowheads. The neolithic fisherman would take turns with spears, and harpoons. Hunting fish and deer mostly. And, all that’s more is gossip and folklore.

What is ‘doggerbank’?

Named after the ‘doggers’, or dutch fishing boats, from medieval times. They were especially useful for cod fishing; dodging storms and catching waves. The actual modern ‘doggerbank’ not only houses wind farms but also a large portion of sand. About 100km east of England. Whereas the wind farms are further out. It was around 7000 years ago that this area, rich and fertile, went under water.

What is the ‘imminent rush’ in researching ‘doggerland’?

Earth passes thru cycles, and even though theories differ about global warming, and climate control, one thing is for sure. Many suffer and get displaced. There was a massive cycle that ended around 8200 years ago, and that was probably brought on by the last glacial maximum (33-14,000 years ago) and ‘great event’ 11,700 years ago. In understanding it, we may be able to prevent the same from happening again.